The UC Patented Strawberry Cultivars

 


The Albion Cultivar

‘Albion’ (previously known as CN220) is a Day-neutral (ever-bearing) cultivar similar to ‘Diamante’. Fruiting plants of ‘Albion’ are similar in size and vigor to ‘Diamante’, but more open, and more erect than plants of ‘Diamante’. Nursery source, chilling requirements, and planting dates should be very similar for ‘Albion’ and ‘Diamante’. ‘Albion’ is quite resistant to Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae) and Phytophthora crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum), and relatively resistant to Anthracnose crown rot (Colletotrichum acutatum). When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites (Tetranychus urticae) equal or greater than ‘Diamante’. When treated with appropriate planting regimes, ‘Albion’ has similar fruit size and produces equal or greater individual-plant yields than ‘Diamante’. The production pattern for ‘Albion’ is similar to that for ‘Diamante’, although it is somewhat earlier to initiate fruiting with most cultural treatments, has a shallower production peak, and is less cyclical in its production pattern. Commercial appearance ratings have been consistently better than those for ‘Diamante’ and the fraction of non-marketable fruit for ‘Albion’ is about half that produced by ‘Diamante’. Fruit from ‘Albion’ is firm, but slightly less so than fruit from ‘Diamante’. External and internal fruit color for ‘Albion’ is darker than ‘Diamante’ fruit. Subjectively, ‘Albion’ has excellent flavor. The fruit will be outstanding for both fresh market and processing.

Albion compared w/ Diamante
Albion compared w/ Aromas
Productivity
0
-
Production Pattern
0
0
Fruit Size
0
+
Firmness
0
+
Appearance
+
+
Flavor
+
+
Post-harvest Storage
+
+
Rain/weather Tolerance
+
0
Disease Tolerance
+
0
Mite Tolerance
0
+
Harvest Ease
+
+
Cull Rate
+
+
Runners
-
-

 


 

Aromas Strawberry Cultivar

A day-neutral strawberry cultivar; high-productivity replacement for Selva and Seascape.

Highlights

  • Exceptional fruit quality, with very good flavor
  • Yields superior to Selva and Seascape
  • Larger fruit and substantially lower cull rate than Selva
  • Robust environmental tolerance, particularly for conditions found near the central coast of California

Plant Description

Aromas is characterized by its exceptional fruit quality (with very good flavor), large fruit sizes on the order of 24-26 grams per fruit, and a plant form that is more erect in comparison with Selva and Seascape.  Also, fewer small fruit are produced, resulting in a cull rate that is much lower than Selva.

Commercial appearance ratings for Aromas fruit are comparable to or better than Selva and Seascape.  Fruit is dark red and adaptable to both fresh market and processing uses.  Aromas fruit is firmer than fruit from Selva and Seascape. Overall, Aromas is the day-neutral cultivar of choice when the special advantages of Diamante (excellent flavor for fresh fruit) and Pacific (later planting and excellent post-harvest processing qualities) are not required.

Disease and Pest Resistance

Aromas is relatively resistant to powdery mildew and Anthracnose crown rot, and is tolerant of strawberry viruses typically encountered in California.  When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites equal or greater than Selva and Seascape.  It is moderately susceptible to common leaf spot and Verticillium wilt, so quality nursery stock and good site preparation are recommended.  Aromas has a broader environmental tolerance than other day-neutral cultivars recently released by the University of California (Diamante and Pacific), so Aromas is the day-neutral of choice when environmental conditions are the decisive factor.

Performance Evaluations

Winter planting trials carried out at the Watsonville Research Facility in 1995 and 1996 show that Aromas is the highest-yielding cultivar among the day-neutral cultivars tested, which included the well-established Seascape and Selva cultivars and the new Diamante and Pacific cultivars.  The increase in yield over Seascape, Selva, and Pacific was quite pronounced, being on the order of 10% to 15%. Aromas is similar to Seascape in requiring nursery harvest and two to three weeks of cold storage prior to planting.  Additional chilling may be required if it is to be planted through a clear tarp.  Aromas is somewhat later to initiate fruiting (2-3 weeks) but also produces greater quantities of late-season fruit.  Aromas benefits from the application of full-bed polyethylene mulch being delayed until late December or early January.

Commercial Availability

Strawberry producers can obtain Aromas from commercial nurseries licensed by the University of California.  See List of Licensed Nurseries.


The Benicia and Mojave Cultivar

The Strawberry Improvement program at UC Davis has released two new short-day cultivars originating from crosses performed in 2004: ‘Benicia’ and ‘Mojave.’ These
cultivars exhibit uniformly high productivity, similar to ‘Ventana’ in both cases, and are adapted to early fall planting and winter production systems. These cultivars have overall fruit quality superior to ‘Ventana.’ These cultivars are expected to complement or replace ‘Ventana’ and ‘Palomar’ where these cultivars are currently grown in California.

‘Benicia’ has moderate to high plant vigor, but is slightly smaller in plant size than ‘Ventana,’ with a similar production pattern. It may require slightly less space in the fruiting field than ‘Ventana.’ The fruit for ‘Benicia’ is slightly larger and slightly firmer than for ‘Ventana.’ Post harvest traits for ‘Benicia’ are similar to those for ‘Ventana,’ although the fruit is slightly darker and has a more evenly colored interior. ‘Benicia’ has very good flavor, substantially better than ‘Ventana’ in early spring. ‘Benicia’ has a good disease resistance profile, although it is susceptible to Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae); this disease will require close control by both nursery and fruit growers in order to farm this cultivar successfully. Nursery productivity for ‘Benicia’ is superior to that for ‘Ventana.’

‘Mojave’ has moderate to high plant vigor, especially early in the season, but is slightly smaller in plant size than ‘Ventana’ throughout the season. With early fall planting, ‘Mojave’ has a similar production pattern to ‘Ventana.’ It may require slightly less space in the fruiting field than ‘Ventana.’ The fruit for ‘Mojave’ is substantially larger than for ‘Ventana,’ but is slightly less firm. Post harvest traits for ‘Benicia’ are similar to those for ‘Ventana.’ ‘Mojave’ has very good flavor, substantially better than ‘Ventana’ in early spring. ‘Benicia’ has a good disease resistance profile, although it is susceptible to Phytophthora crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum); this disease will require close control by both nursery and fruit growers in order to farm this cultivar successfully. Nursery productivity for ‘Mojave’ is superior to that for ‘Ventana.’

Table 1. Performance of Camarosa, Ventana and Palomar compared with Benicia and Mojave at the Watsonville Research Facility in 2008-2010
Item Early Yield (C/Acre) Yield (C/Acre) Appearance Score (5=best) Fruit Size (g/fruit) Firmness
Camarosa
1,241
6,963
2.7
28.5
10.3
Ventana
2,953
7,840
2.9
32.9
9.7
Palomar
2,503
7,911
3.7
33.8
10.6
Benicia (C225)
3,303
7,691
3.6
34.3
10.0
Mojave (C227)
2,187
6,559
3.7
35.7
9.6

Macdoel plants harvested 10-15, planted with 1 week storage (52″ 2-row beds, 17,300 plants/acre)

Table 2. Disease resistance scores for Camarosa, Ventana and Palomar compared with Benicia and Mojave in 2008-2010.
Item Phytophthora Resistance Score (5=best) Verticillium Resistance Score (5=best) Colletotrichum Resistance Score1 (5=best)
Camarosa
3.0
3.5
2.8
Ventana
2.3
3.2
3.0
Palomar
3.1
4.1
3.1
Benicia (C225)
3.6
2.2
2.8
Mojave (C227)
2.5
4.1
3.0

¹2009 and 2010 results only.

Qualitative Evaluations of Performance for Two Short-day Selections
‘Benicia’ compared w/ Ventana
‘Mojave’ compared w/ Ventana
Productivity
0
-
Production Pattern
0
+
Fruit Size
+
+
Firmness
+
0
Appearance
+
+
Flavor
+
+
Post-harvest Storage
+
0
Rain/weather Tolerance
+
0
Disease Tolerance
0
0
Mite Tolerance
0
0
Harvest Ease
+
+
Cull Rate
+
+
Runners (Nursery)
+
+

“+”, “0”, or “-” implies performance for each selection that is superior to, similar to, or inferior to Ventana in each of the listed categories

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The Diamante Cultivar

A day-neutral strawberry cultivar; premium-quality replacement for Selva and Seascape for fresh fruit production.

Highlights

  • Exceptional fresh fruit quality and excellent flavor with very large fruit size
  • Yields superior to Selva and Seascape
  • Very compact, erect form facilitates higher plant densities and easier harvest
  • Shorter cold storage period prior to planting
  • Very low cull rate

Plant Description

Diamante is characterized by its exceptional fruit quality and excellent flavor, very large fruit sizes on the order of 30-31 grams per fruit, and a plant form that is very compact and more erect in comparison with Selva and Seascape. Also, fewer small fruit are produced, resulting in a cull rate that is much lower than Selva.

Commercial appearance ratings for Diamante fruit are significantly better than Selva and Seascape. Diamante fruit is as firm as fruit from Selva and firmer than Seascape. Diamante’s internal fruit color is lighter than other day-neutral cultivars, so it is not as well suited for the processing industry as it is for the fresh fruit industry. Overall, Diamante is the day-neutral cultivar of choice when premium-quality fresh fruit are desired and the special advantages of Aromas (higher productivity) and Pacific (later planting and excellent post-harvest processing qualities) are not required.

Propagation and Growth

Diamante is similar to Selva and Seascape in requiring cold storage prior to planting, except that Diamante requires less chilling for optimal performance. Diamante begins fruiting two to three weeks later than Selva or Seascape, so a nursery harvest is best done in mid-October to provide a long fall growing season. Full-bed polyethylene mulch should be applied relatively early with Diamante, with tarps being applied by mid-December to avoid yield reductions and excess runner production.

Disease and Pest Resistance

Diamante is relatively resistant to powdery mildew, and is tolerant of strawberry viruses typically encountered in California. When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites substantially greater than Selva and Seascape. It is moderately susceptible to common leaf spot, Verticillium wilt, Phytophthora cactorum crown rot, and Anthracnose crown rot, so quality nursery stock and good site preparation are recommended.

Performance Evaluations

Winter planting trials carried out at the Watsonville Research Facility show that Diamante ranks as the second highest-yielding cultivar among the day-neutral cultivars tested, which included the well-established Seascape and Selva cultivars and the new Aromas and Pacific cultivars. The increase in yield over Seascape, Selva, and Pacific was quite pronounced, and Diamante was only moderately lower than the highest yielding cultivar, Aromas.

Commercial Availability

Strawberry producers can obtain Diamante from commercial nurseries licensed by the University of California. See List of Licensed Nurseries.

  Monterey compared w/ Albion
San Andreas compared w/ Albion
Portola compared w/ Albion
Productivity
+
+
+
Production Pattern
0
0
+
Fruit Size
+
0
0
Firmness
0
+
0
Appearance
-
+
0
Flavor
+
0
0
Post-harvest Storage
-
0
0
Rain/weather Tolerance
0
+
-
Disease Tolerance
-
0
0
Mite Tolerance
0
0
0
Harvest Ease
-
+
+
Cull Rate
0
+
0
Runners
0
+
0

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Gaviota Strawberry Cultivar

A short-day strawberry cultivar with extended flowering under cool conditions (Aiko-type); replacement for summer-planted Pajaro and winter-planted Camarosa and Chandler.

Highlights

  • Excellent fruit quality and flavor
  • Yields superior to Pajaro (summer planting) and equal or better than Camarosa and Chandler (winter planting)
  • Larger fruit, easier harvest, and much lower cull rate than Camarosa
  • Robust environmental tolerance, particularly resistant to rain damage, powder mildew, and anthracnose crown rot

Plant Description

Gaviota is characterized by its exceptional fruit quality (especially flavor), large fruit sizes on the order of 26-28 grams per fruit, and a plant form that is open, compact, and erect in comparison with Camarosa and Chandler.  Also, fewer small fruit are produced, resulting in a cull rate that is only half that of Camarosa.  Gaviota fruit have better rain tolerance than Camarosa.

Commercial appearance ratings for Gaviota fruit are comparable to or better than Chandler and Camarosa.  Gaviota fruit is substantially firmer than fruit from Chandler but is slightly less firm than Camarosa.  Gaviota’s flavor is less aromatic than Chandler, but has better balance and texture than Camarosa.  Fruit color is similar to Camarosa.  Overall, Gaviota fruit makes an excellent choice for both fresh and processed products.

Disease and Pest Resistance

Gaviota is relatively resistant to powdery mildew and Anthracnose crown rot, and is tolerant of strawberry viruses typically encountered in California.  When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites equal or greater than Chandler and Camarosa.  It is moderately susceptible to common leaf spot, Verticillium wilt, and Phytophthora cactorum crown rot, so quality nursery stock and good site preparation are recommended.

Performance Evaluations

Cold-stored “frigo” plants can be used for summer plantings, and plants can be established in late October or early November using high elevation planting stock.  Summer planting trials carried out at the Watsonville Research Facility in 1995 and 1996 show that while Gaviota yields less than Camarosa on a per plant basis, the higher planting density made possible by its more compact form allows for equal or superior yields per acre.  This advantage in crates per acre yielded is typically 5% to 10%, with a very pronounced difference in late-season yields.  Gaviota yields outperformed Pajaro yields in these tests by an even more substantial margin.

Winter planting trials carried out at Watsonville show similar advantages in per acre yields for Gaviota over Camarosa, particularly for plants that had undergone longer periods of supplemental storage. Gaviota is not adapted to the early fall digging/planting system used in Southern California.  It was also noted that the greater rain tolerance and relatively later fruiting period for Gaviota might offer further advantages in unusually wet seasons by avoiding some of the fruit damage that might otherwise occur.

Commercial Availability

Strawberry producers can obtain Gaviota  from commercial nurseries licensed by the University of California.  See List of Licensed Nurseries.


The Monterey Cultivar

MONTEREY is moderate in day-neutrality, slightly stronger flowering than Albion with a similar production pattern. It has a vigorous plant and may require slightly more space than Albion. The fruit for MONTEREY is slightly larger but less firm than for Albion. Post harvest traits for MONTEREY are similar to those for Albion. MONTEREY has outstanding flavor with a distinct sweet aftertaste that is unique among California cultivars. MONTEREY has a good disease resistance profile, although it is susceptible to powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca macularis); this disease will require close control by both nursery and fruit growers in order to farm this cultivar successfully. Nursery productivity for MONTEREY is exceptional.

Monterey compared w/ Albion
San Andreas compared w/ Albion
Portola compared w/ Albion
Productivity
+
+
+
Production Pattern
0
0
+
Fruit Size
+
0
0
Firmness
0
+
0
Appearance
-
+
0
Flavor
+
0
0
Post-harvest Storage
-
0
0
Rain/weather Tolerance
0
+
-
Disease Tolerance
-
0
0
Mite Tolerance
0
0
0
Harvest Ease
-
+
+
Cull Rate
0
+
0
Runners
0
+
0

Performance of Aromas, Diamante, and Albion compared with Monterey (CN222), San Andreas (CN223), and Portola (CN224) at the Watsonville Research Facility in 2005-2007
Item Yield (C/Acre) Late Yield (C/Acre) Appearance Score (5=best) Fruit Size (g/fruit) Firmness
Aromas
9,495
2,401
3.1
27.6
9.5
Diamante
8,313
2,420
3.5
31.5
11.0
Albion
7,783
2,247
3.9
30.6
11.2
Monterey
10,554
3,062
3.4
32.6
10.8
San Andreas
10,414
3,238
4.4
30.8
11.6
Portola
10,335
3,324
3.6
31.5
10.2

Macdoel plants harvested 10-15, planted with 2.5-3.5 weeks storage (52″ 2-row beds, 17,300 plants/acre)

Disease resistance scores for Albion compared with Monterey (CN222), San Andreas (CN223), and Portola (CN224) in 2005-2007
Cultivar Phytophthora Resistance Score (5=best) Verticillium Resistance Score (5=best) Colletotrichum Resistance Score (5=best)
Albion
4.3
3.8
3.4
Monterey (CN222)
3.2
3.4
2.4
San Andreas (CN223)
3.8
3.8
2.9
Portola (CN224)
4.4
3.3
2.7
Qualitative evaluations of performance for Monterey (CN222), San Andreas (CN223), and Portola (CN224) compared with Albion
Monterey compared w/ Albion
San Andreas compared w/ Albion
Portola compared w/ Albion
Productivity
+
+
+
Production Pattern
0
0
+
Fruit Size
+
0
0
Firmness
0
+
0
Appearance
-
+
0
Flavor
+
0
0
Post-harvest Storage
-
0
0
Rain/weather Tolerance
0
+
-
Disease Tolerance
-
0
0
Mite Tolerance
0
0
0
Harvest Ease
-
+
+
Cull Rate
0
+
0
Runners (Nursery)
0
+
0

“+”, “0”, or “-” implies performance for each selection that is superior to, similar to, or inferior to Albion in each of the listed categories


Pacific Strawberry Cultivar

A day-neutral strawberry cultivar; replacement for Selva and Seascape when later planting or superior post-harvest handling qualities are required.

Highlights

  • Excellent fruit quality, with very good flavor
  • Yields superior to Selva
  • Outstanding post-harvest handling and storage features
  • Larger fruit and lower cull rate than Selva, produces runners infrequently

Plant Description

Pacific is characterized by its excellent fruit quality (with very good flavor), large fruit sizes on the order of 27-28 grams per fruit, and a plant form that is more erect in comparison with Selva and Seascape.  Also, fewer small fruit are produced, resulting in a cull rate that is much lower than Selva.  Pacific produces fewer runners than other day-neutral cultivars.

Commercial appearance ratings for Pacific fruit are comparable to or better than Selva and Seascape.  Pacific fruit is firmer than fruit from Seascape but not as firm as Selva. Overall, Pacific is the day-neutral cultivar of choice when later planting than Aromas or Diamante or excellent post-harvest processing qualities are desired.

Propagation and Growth

Pacific is similar to Selva in requiring nursery harvest and three to four weeks of supplemental cold storage prior to planting.  Like Selva,  Pacific benefits from the application of full-bed polyethylene mulch being delayed until mid-January.

Disease and Pest Resistance

Pacific is relatively resistant to powdery mildew and is tolerant of strawberry viruses typically encountered in California.  When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites equal or greater than Selva and Seascape.  It is moderately susceptible to Anthracnose crown rot, common leaf spot and Verticillium wilt, so quality nursery stock and good site preparation are recommended.

Performance Evaluations

Winter planting trials carried out at the Watsonville Research Facility in 1995 and 1996 show that Pacific is comparable to or better than the well-established Seascape and Selva cultivars.  Although yields are not as high as the new Diamante and Aromas cultivars, Pacific throws fewer runners and is thus suited to planting after mid-November.

Commercial Availability

Strawberry producers can obtain Pacific from commercial nurseries licensed by the University of California.  See Licensed Nurseries List


The Palomar Cultivar

Performance of short-day cultivar Palomar at the South Coast R.E.C. (Irvine), Santa Maria, and Watsonville Strawberry Research Facility in 2004-2006


The Portola Cultivar

PORTOLA is a strong day-neutral cultivar with broad adaptability. This cultivar can be used in standard winter planting systems, where it is slightly earlier than Albion to initiate fruiting. Due to a strong flowering response PORTOLA is especially well adapted to spring and summer planting systems. PORTOLA has a vigorous plant and may require slightly lower plant density than Albion. The fruit for PORTOLA is similar in size to Albion but lighter in color and somewhat more shiny. Post harvest characteristics for PORTOLA are similar to those for Albion although it is slightly less tolerant to rain. Fruit flavor for PORTOLA is excellent and especially consistent throughout the fruiting season. PORTOLA has a good disease resistance profile with no outstanding cautions. Nursery productivity for PORTOLA is exceptional.

Monterey compared w/ Albion
San Andreas compared w/ Albion
Portola compared w/ Albion
Productivity
+
+
+
Production Pattern
0
0
+
Fruit Size
+
0
0
Firmness
0
+
0
Appearance
-
+
0
Flavor
+
0
0
Post-harvest Storage
-
0
0
Rain/weather Tolerance
0
+
-
Disease Tolerance
-
0
0
Mite Tolerance
0
0
0
Harvest Ease
-
+
+
Cull Rate
0
+
0
Runners
0
+
0

Comparison of Monterey, San Andreas and Portola to Albion


The San Andreas Cultivar

SAN ANDREAS is a moderate day-neutral with a production pattern very similar to Albion. Plant vigor for SAN ANDREAS is somewhat higher than for Albion early in the season but plant size throughout the fruiting season is similar to Albion due to its high and consistent productivity. This cultivar produces few runners in the fruiting field. The fruit for SAN ANDREAS is exceptional in appearance and especially superior to Albion early in the season. The fruit color for SAN ANDREAS fruit is slightly lighter than for Albion, and it has similar post harvest characteristics. The flavor of SAN ANDREAS is outstanding, very similar to that for Albion. SAN ANDREAS has a good disease resistance profile with no outstanding cautions. Its typically high quality fruit early in the season, together with a low chilling requirement, make this a good candidate cultivar for southern California. Nursery productivity for SAN ANDREAS is similar to or slightly below that for Albion.

Monterey compared w/ Albion
San Andreas compared w/ Albion
Portola compared w/ Albion
Productivity
+
+
+
Production Pattern
0
0
+
Fruit Size
+
0
0
Firmness
0
+
0
Appearance
-
+
0
Flavor
+
0
0
Post-harvest Storage
-
0
0
Rain/weather Tolerance
0
+
-
Disease Tolerance
-
0
0
Mite Tolerance
0
0
0
Harvest Ease
-
+
+
Cull Rate
0
+
0
Runners
0
+
0

Comparison of Monterey, San Andreas and Portola to Albion


The Ventana Cultivar

Camino Real

Camino Real (C213) is a short-day (June bearing) cultivar similar to Camarosa and Gaviota. Fruiting plants of Camino Real are smaller, more compact, more open, more erect, and less vigorous than plants of Camarosa. Camino Real plants are more compact but less erect than Gaviota plants. Camino Real is moderately susceptible to common leaf spot (Ramularia tulasnei) and somewhat sensitive to powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca macularis). It is quite resistant to Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae) and Phytophthora crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum), and relatively resistant to Anthracnose crown rot (Colletotrichum acutatum). When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites (Tetranychus urticae) equal or greater than Gaviota. When treated with appropriate planting regimes, Camino Real has larger fruit and produces greater individual-plant yields than Gaviota or Camarosa. The production pattern for Camino Real is similar to that for Camarosa, although it is somewhat later to initiate fruiting with most cultural treatments. Commercial appearance ratings have been better than those for Gaviota and Camarosa and trials conducted in Santa Maria, CA in 1998-98 indicate a fraction of non-marketable fruit that is about half that produced by Camarosa. Fruit from Camino Real is substantially firmer than fruit from Gaviota and similar in firmness to Camarosa. External and internal fruit color for Camino Real is darker than Camarosa and slightly darker than Gaviota. Subjectively, Camino Real has very good flavor. The fruit will be outstanding for both fresh market and processing.

Ventana

Ventana (C216) is a short-day (June bearing) cultivar similar to Camarosa. Fruiting plants of Ventana are large and vigorous, similar to Camarosa, but more open than plants of Camarosa; Ventana plants are larger and less erect than plants of Gaviota. Ventana is moderately susceptible to common leaf spot (Ramularia tulasnei) and Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae). It is quite resistant to Phytophthora crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum), and relatively resistant to powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca macularis). When treated properly, it has tolerance to two-spotted spidermites (Tetranychus urticae) equal or greater than Gaviota and Camarosa. When treated with appropriate planting regimes, Ventana has similar fruit size and produces greater individual-plant yields than Gaviota or Camarosa. In general, Ventana is well adapted to very early season planting. The production pattern for Ventana is similar to that for Camarosa: it initiates fruiting at the same time, but produces greater quantities of early-season fruit with most cultural treatments. Commercial appearance ratings have been better than those for Camarosa, and trials conducted in Santa Maria, CA in 1999-2000 indicate a fraction of non-marketable fruit that is less than half that produced by Camarosa. Fruit for Ventana is slightly firmer than fruit from Gaviota but slightly less firm than Camarosa. External and internal fruit color for Ventana is lighter than Camarosa and Gaviota, with substantially brighter red coloration. Subjectively, Ventana has very good flavor. The fruit will be outstanding for both fresh market and processing.

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